Jonathan W Densmore and Nancy Bates (Blog 13)

We have a DNA match with someone with shared ancestors Jonathan W Densmore and Nancy Bates!  One person shares these ancestors with a significant DNA match of 58 centimorgans shared across 3 DNA segments (shows 3rd cousin once removed with my software).

Jonathan W Densmore

We show this couple in our database with birth and marriage dates in our database but have no sources for this data so won’t share it until we find a source.  We do have sources regarding their relationship — from the death records of three of their children and from their daughter Harriet’s baptismal and marriage records.

Hopefully someday we’ll learn more about the lives of this couple.

CHILDREN:

Harriet Densmore (1841-1925) – married Alexander Ross – moved to Seattle, Washington

Levi Benson Densmore (1845-1905) – married Ada Kate English [my ancestors]

Jonathan W Densmore (1849-1903) – married Sarah Jane Martin

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

Canada “Web: Canada, Wesleyan Methodist Baptismal Register, 1828-1910,” index, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 12 January 2018), Harriet Densmore.

Michigan “Michigan Deaths and Burials, 1800-1995,” index, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 26 January 2014), Levi B Densmore, d. 16 Jan 1905 Travers City, Grand Traverse, Michigan.

Michigan “Michigan Deaths and Burials, 1800-1995,” index, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 26 January 2014), John W Densmore d. 3 Dec 1903.

“Ontario Marriages, 1869-1927,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KZBJ-9T1 : accessed 1 August 2017), Alexander Ross and Harriet Densmore.

“Washington, Death Records, 1883-1960,” index, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 12 January 2018), Harriett D Ross.

1/14/2018 – updated the spelling of Jonathan’s name based on feedback from another descendant who has some additional source information (a family Bible!)

Copyright 2018 Joanne Shackford Parkes  (sharing a link to this post is appreciated but please do not copy this material and paste it elsewhere.

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Lucinda (Backus) Bemis (1818-1889) (Blog 12)

Lucinda Backus, the daughter of John and Lucinda (Johnson) Backus was born in 1818 in Norwich Connecticut.  She married Amariah Nelson Bemis on Sept 9, 1839.

She’s mentioned in this biographical sketch which like most sketches written in the 1900s describes more of her husband than her:

Lucinda Backus Bemis Annals of Oxford New York p 543LUCINDA, born in 1818, was married to Amariah N.
Bemis in 1839. They lived in Oxford village till 1851,
when they removed to Lyon Brook, where Mr. Bemis
bought and operated the mills. For many years he trans-
ported his lumber to New York by canal. In 1870 he sold
the mills and moved to Esmen township, Ill., where Mrs.
Bemis died in 1889 Mr. Bemis dying at his daughter’s in
Oxford in 1897. They left four children:
Nelson A., married Sarah Sheldon of Guilford, N. Y.
Residence, Odell, Ill.
Mary, married Albert C. Greene. Residence, West-
minister, Conn.
Harriet Lucinda, married Dr. D. A. Gleason of Oxford.
Sarah Abigal, married Frank Raisbeck. Residence,
Bloomington, Ill.

Lucinda is also mentioned at least three times in the Lineage Books of the National Society of the Daughter’s of the American Revolution as descendants of her great grandfather Obediah Johnson (1736-1881) of Canterbury, Connecticut who served in the Revolutionary War as a captain of the 4th Company in 1775 and promoted to Colonel by 1777.

Lucinda died on March 15, 1889.

CHILDREN:

Nelson Amariah Bemis (1840-1912) – served in the Civil War, married Sarah Sheldon

Mary E Bemis (1842-1932) – married Albert Chace Greene [my line]

Harriet Lucinda Bemis (1850-1927) – married Albert DeWitt Gleason

Sarah Abigail Bemis (1857-1946) – married Francis Maxwell Raisbeck

John Bemis (??????)

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

Galpin Henry J, Annals of Oxford, New York with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Some of Its Prominent Men and Early Pioneers (Oxford, N.Y.: Times Book and Job Printing House, 1906), page 543; digital images, Google Books (https://books.google.com/books : accessed 8 January 2018.

The History of Livingston County, Illinois Containing A History of the County – (Chicago: WM. Le BARON, 1878), page 727; digital images, Google Books (https://books.google.com/books :

McDuffee Alice Louise, Lineage Book National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume XCI 9090-91000 1912 (Washington, D. C.: 1927), page 166; digital images, Google Books (http://books.google.com : accessed 8 January 2018.

Copyright 2017 Joanne Shackford Parkes  (sharing a link to this post is appreciated but please do not copy this material and paste it elsewhere)

 

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week #1 – Amariah Nelson Bemis (1814-1897) (Blog 11)

This  year we’re going to start our 52 Ancestor’s in 52 Weeks Challenge researching and blogging about ancestors who show up in Ancestry DNA as a shared ancestor of another person who has taken a DNA test.  Our first ancestor is Amariah Nelson Bemis, the first shared ancestor showing up in Ancestry.  (I share 95 cm along 5 DNA segments with another Ancestry member who shares Amariah as an ancestor.)

Shared Ancestor - Amariah Nelson Bemis

Amariah Nelson Bemis,  the son of Amariah and Sally (Shumway) Bemis was born on March 16, 1814 in Tolland, Connecticut.  He married Lucinda Backus, the daughter of John and Lucinda (Johnson) Backus on September 9, 1839.

According to published biographies, he lived in Oxford, New York, then Lyon Brook, New York where he operated a mill and moved his lumber to New York by the canals.  They moved to Esmen, Illinois where he worked as a farmer and stock raiser.  Census records show he also worked as a brakeman, in the lumber business.

A. N. Bemis he History of Livingston County, Illinois Containing A History of the County - (Chicago- WM. Le BARON, 1878), page 727
The History of Livingston County, Illinois, p 727

A. N. BEMIS, farmer and stock raiser;
P. O. Odell; was born in Tolland Co.,
Conn., March 16, 1814; removed to New
York State, where he remained thirty-five
years, thence to Illinois in 1868, settling
in Esmen, Livingston Co., where he now
owns 160 acres of land, valued at $6,400.
Was married Sept. 9, 1839, to Miss Lu-
cinda Backus; she was born in Chenango
Co., N. Y., June 18, 1818; they have
had five children, four of whom are living
–Nelson, Mary, Harriet and Sarah; de-
ceased-John.

Amariah’s wife Lucinda died on March 15, 1889 at the age of 72 and a year later he married Annis W (Curtis) Dunham.  He was 76 at the time of his second marriage and lived seven years, dying on March 14, 1897.  He was  buried in Pontiac, Illinois.

According to an obituary published in the Northwestern Christian Advocate, “he was a man of
more than average intelligence, of positive and independent thought, but withal possessed of that quality always indicative of true greatness-a modest and unassuming spirit.”

Children:

Nelson Amariah Bemis (1840-1912) – served in the Civil War, married Sarah Sheldon

Mary E Bemis (1842-1932) – married Albert Chace Greene [my line]

Harriet Lucinda Bemis (1850-1927) – married Albert DeWitt Gleason

Sarah Abigail Bemis (1857-1946) – married Francis Maxwell Raisbeck

John Bemis (??????)

Note:  Amariah went by Amariah Bemis, Amariah N Bemis, Nelson A Bemis, A. N. Bemis & possibly other names.  We’re still looking for source material that mentions him so we can learn more about his life.

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

1850 United States Federal Census, Chenago County, New York, population schedule, Oxford, page 41, dwelling 1331, family 1409, Amariah N Bemis; digital images, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 8 January 2018).

1855 New York State Census, Chenango County, population schedule, , dwelling 202, Ari Bemis; digital images, FamilySearch.org (http://familysearch.org : accessed 8 January 2018).

1860 United States Federal Census, Chenago County, New York, population schedule, Oxford, Page No 11, dwelling 87, family 87, A Nelson Bemis; digital images, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 8 January 2018).

1865 New York State Census, Chenango County, population schedule, Oxford, Page 1073 (stamped), Amariah N Bemis; digital images, FamilySearch.org (http://familysearch.org : accessed 8 January 2018).

1870 United States Federal Census, Livingstone County, Illinois, population schedule, Odell, Page No 242 (stamped), Nelson Bemis; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 8 January 2018).

1880 United States Federal Census, Livingstone County, Illinois, population schedule, Esmen Township, enumeration district (ED) 107, dwelling 141, family 142, A N Bemis; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 7 January 2018).

Find A Grave, Find A Grave, digital images (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 8 January 2018), Amariah Nelson Bemis, Find A Grave Memorial# 112647743.

The History of Livingston County, Illinois Containing A History of the County – (Chicago: WM. Le BARON, 1878), page 727; digital images, Google Books (https://books.google.com/books : accessed 8 January 2018.

Northwestern Christian Advocate (5 May 1897), page 23; digital images, Google News (https://books.google.com/books : accessed 9 January 2018.

Copyright 2017 Joanne Shackford Parkes  (sharing a link to this post is appreciated but please do not copy this material and paste it elsewhere)

Updated 1/9/2018 to add information found about Amariah in the Northwestern Christian Advocate and details re lumbering business  and to add a link to blog about Lucinda

#52Ancestors

Tombstone Tuesday – Finding Edward Edwards’ Gravestone in Aberystwyth, Wales (Blog 10)

In Dec 2017 we travelled to Aberystwyth, Wales where we connected with many great folks who made our visit extra special by helping us get oriented to this beautiful town which we hope to visit again in the future.  We visited the National Library of Wales where we read letters written by children of Edward R Edwards (my 2nd great grandfather) to their uncle Jack Edwards, one of which mentions my father!  We attended a meeting of the Cardiganshire Family History Society and learned of the library’s crowdsourcing projects.  We also met wonderful folks in the Ceredigion Archives who helped us find more about of Edward’s son Jack.  One day we walked to the Aberystwyth Cemetery and after a long hunt, found Edward Edward’s gravestone (my 3rd great grandfather) and discovered that he was buried with his wife Elizabeth (Jones) Edwards and son Jack Edwards.

fullsizeoutput_4b7

MUSIC SYMBOLS

Iesu ei hun-an

YMA Y GORPHWYS WEDDILLION

EDWARD EDWARDS,

Pencerdd Ceredigion

YR HWN FU FARW MEDI YR 16 EC, 1897

YN 8I MLWYDD OED

HEFYD

EI ANWYL BRIOD

ELIZABETH EDWARDS

YR HON A’I RHAGFLAENODD RHAGFRYR 18, 1865

YN 52 MLWYDD OED

Coffadwriaeth y cyfiawn sydd fendigedig.

HEFYD

JACK EDWARDS

LLYFRWERTHWR,

BU FARW MEHEFIN 15EC 1942

YN 88 MLWYDD OED

Since we don’t speak Welsh, we used Google Translate to convert the gravestone inscription to English but sense that it might not be a good translator or we didn’t note the letters on the gravestone correctly.  We’d love any input to correct either as we’d love to ensure we’re sharing both the correct Welsh wording and the English translations.

ENGLISH TRANSLATION (with the gracious assistance of members of the Facebook group “You know you’re from Aberystwyth when you..)

MUSIC SYMBOLS

Jesus himself

Here lies the remains of

EDWARD EDWARDS,

Pencerdd Ceredigion

Who died Sept 16th 1897

Aged 81

ALSO

His beloved wife

ELIZABETH EDWARDS

Who went before him December 18, 1865

AT 52 YEARS

Remembrance of the righteous is blessed

ALSO

JACK EDWARDS

Bookseller

Who died June 15th 1942

Aged 88 YEARS

Edward is buried next to Mary Jones of Corporation Street who died May 22, 1885 and his daughter Anne Edwards who died in 1909.  We aren’t sure how or if Mary is related but do note that Edward’s wife’s last name was Jones.  As we look at the photo of the gravestone, we note that a Jenkins is buried nearby — wish we’d looked closer as Edward’s daughter Elizabeth married Rev John Austin Jenkins – we’re unsure if this grave marker is connected to this particular family.

Aberystwyth Cemetery ResearchWe were able to find the gravestone by using the Cyngor Sir Ceredigion City Council WEB site which included an aerial photo which showed us how to find the cemetery, the Aberystwyth Cemetery layout which helped us orient within the cemetery.

 

Researching Edward Edward's Gravesite

We also used the >Search the Cemetery Database (shown above) which told us that Edward was in plot 9, grave 960, and the Aberystwyth Cemetery Location which sort of showed us where gravestone 960 was located– it got us close to the gravestone but not exactly in the right spot.  The gravestones are very close together so it was difficult to find an appropriate place to walk to find the gravestone.

We wish to thank the members of the Ceredigion Family History Society who helped us meet a possible distant relative and made us feel extremely welcome in a new town!  We’d also like to thank the Ceredigion County Council for making the information easy to access as this allowed us to research the location from our wonderful guest house.  We’ve added our image of this gravestone to FindAGrave so someone else who can’t make the trip to Aberystwyth can see the image of Edward’s gravestone.

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

Cyngor Sir Ceredigion County Council (https://www.ceredigion.gov.uk : accessed 18 December 2017), Cemetery Search Edward Edwards.

Tombstone for Edward Edwards, Elizabeth Edwards, and Jack Edwards, Edward, Sept 16, 1897, 81 yrs; Elizabeth 1865, 52 yrs; Jack 1942, 88 years, Aberystwyth Cemetery, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales. photo taken by Joanne Parkes,

Copyright 2017 Joanne Shackford Parkes  (sharing a link to this post is appreciated but please do not copy this material and paste it elsewhere)

Photos Kept By E.R.Edwards (Blog 9, Ancestor 40)

Fortunately cousin Chris recently shared a box of  photos that were kept by my Uncle Tom.  Unfortunately these photos were not labeled so we’re sharing some the photographs in the hope that we can identify who is in these pictures.

This first photo is just labeled Oct 15, 1913 and was printed on hard cardboard stock.  Edward R. Shackford would have been 68 so he is not in the picture and in 1913, none of Edward’s children had children these ages.  We are not sure who is in these pictures or where the photo was taken.

Photo 2 dated Oct 15 1913

 

This photo is stamped E.R. Edwards.  The gentleman on the right seems to be the same person as in the first picture but does not seem dressed to be working in a field.

Photo 3 stamped E.R. Edwards

We’ll be scanning more pictures from this collection to see if we can learn who might be in these and the other photos.

We thank cousin Chris for sending them!

 

Sunday’s Obituary – Mr Edward Edwards (Pencerdd Ceredigion) (1816-1897) (Blog 8, Ancestor 40, 3rd great grandfather)

As we mentioned earlier, once we knew that Edward Edwards of Wales had been given the bardic title Pencerdd Ceredigion, it was easy to find information about him including a photograph!  We’ve started looking in Welsh newspapers – so far we’ve found multiple obituaries, two in Welsh (Google Translate is very helpful but not perfect…), one in Scranton Pennslyvania, and two in English that look to be identical, one published in the Cardigan Bay Visitor and the other in the Cambrian News and Merionethshire Standard.  We presume there are many more.

This obituary unfortunately does not name Edward’s parents but does give us the name of his wife, (Elizabeth Jones).  It tells us a bit of Edward’s youth, describes his musical skills in depth, lists his various careers – shoemaker, bookbinder and stationer, and lists the names of his five children including Edward Edwards of America, Jack Edwards, Mrs James Hughes (does not name Mary who was deceased),  Anne Edwards, and Mrs Elizabeth Jenkins.  The obituary lists some of his grandchildren.  It is quite long but interestingly describes the growth of Aberystwyth and various churches, the creation of musical notation, the development of the phonograph, and Edward’s influence in music in Wales.

For now, we’re stuck again on this family line but we’ve broken through barriers in the past so perhaps in the future we can discover the names of Edward’s parents and/or learn if he had any siblings.

Death of Mr Edward Edwards Death of Mr Edward Edwards, The Cardigan Bay Visitor (Aberystwyth Wales), 25 September 1897 part 1
The Cardigan Bay Visitor Aberystwyth, Wales, 25 Sept 1897

Death of Mr Edward Edwards

Mr Edward Edwards, bookbinder and stationer,
Great Darkgate street, died at mid-night on Thurs-
day of last week. The deceased was known in
local musical circles as Pencerdd Ceredigion, a
bardic title conferred on him at the National
Eisteddfod held at Aberstwyth in 1885. For
over two generations he had taken an active and
prominent part in musical matters in Aberystwyth
and South Wales, living as a citizen an intelligent,
simple, and blameless life. He had been in failing
health since Easter, but was not confined to his
bed until a fortnight ago. He was attended in his
last days by Dr Rowlands. He was sharp and
bright up to the last, and was returning into bed
about mid-night on Thursday when he sunk on the
bed and passed away without his attendants knowing
that death had taken place. He was eighty-one
years of age. There are but very few living in
the town who were alive when Mr Edwards was a
youth. To the majority of the residents he was a
man in middle age when they first saw him.
Ieuan Gwyllt. one of his pupils, has passed over to
the great majority so long as to have almost lost
his personality to the present generation. He was
one of the few remaining links connecting the Aber
ystwyth of to-day with Aberystwyth without a
railway; when the harbour supplied merchandise
for a district limited only by Shrewsbury and
Brecon; when visitors to the town could be
numbered by tens when Aberystwyth was
governed by a Court Leet and had not even attained
the dignity of a parish; and when a carrel organ
was the highest form of instrumental music in the
church which then existed at Aberystwyth, and
chapels had not even a precentor to lead the singing
By his death Aberystwyth has lost an interesting
personality, the town a good citizen, his acquaint-
ances a warm and sincere friend, his Chapel a faith-
ful member and Sunday School teacher; and all, the
living example of a simple blameless life. General
sympathy is felt for all the members of the family
who survive.
Mr Edwards was born at Aberystwyth in a
house not far from the place where he died. He
was born in the year 1816. His father was the
son of Shon Saer who gave the name to Rhiw Shon
Saer between Aberystwyth and Gogerddan. His
grandfather on his mother’s side was a carrier who
took merchandise brought by sea inland as far as
Shrewsbury, and returned with cargoes of timber
which was used for shipbuilding and other pur-
poses. When three years of age, Mr Edwards’s
father died, and when between the age
of nine and twelve he was employed
as herd boy at a place then called
the Living but now Loveegrove. At the
early age of ten he had charge of a team of horses
which went ever Bank Syfydryn to Steddfa Gurig
for peat, passing over the bleak uplands near
Craig-y-Pistyll. Shortly afterward he abandoned
the whip for the awl and was apprenticed to a shoe-
maker at Cefnvaenor near Capel Dewi. When out
of his time he came into Aberystwyth to live and
then he worked for Elias Davies and John Jones,
y Crydd. At that time he had attained proficiency
as a singer and it was no unusual sight to see him
with his apronful of work coming down the street
with Ambrose Lloyd singing over a piece of music
which had struck their fancy at the time. Sub-
sequently, Mr Edwards took to book selling,
carrying on business in Princess-street, and
ultimately he learnt the trade of bookbinder from
a tradesman of the same name then living in North-
gate-street, and some thirty-seven years ago re-
moved to the present premises in Great Darkgate-
street.
But, perhaps, the most interesting feature of Mr
Edwards’ career is the part he took in singing, in
the promotion of choral music, and in the use of
singing as an aid to temperance. In his childhood,
the only place in the upper part of Cardiganshire
where music sung in more than two parts could be
heard was Llanbadarn Church. That Church had
also an orchestra which was brought out on red-
letter days to the wonder and delight of the young
people who are now approaching three score and
ten years. Mr Edwards’ first recollection in his
musical career was his being carried as a child to
Llanbadarn Church to hear the singing. When a
youth, though not formally appointed, he was
looked upon as the leader of the singing at Capel
Dewi Calvinistic Methodist Chapel. As illustrating
the primitive state of public worship among the
Connexion of those days as well as the general
ignorance of music, Mr Edwards related how, on
one occasion when he happened to be late, a mem-
ber of the congregation got up on his arrival and
interrupted the preacher with the request that he
should give out that hymn again, as the “hogyn”
had come who could lead the congregation in singing
it. It appeared that the hymn had been given out
before young Edwards’s arrival and that the con-
gregation had broken down in the attempt to sing
it. There were then no tonic-solfa classes or choral
societies and not one man or woman in a hundred
who could spell out the old notation. Mr Edwards
happened to pick up a piece of music containing
the notes of a hymn he knew and by identifying
the notes by the tones of the voice he first acquired
the rudiments of a knowledge of music in which he
ultimately became as technical in theory as that of
any musician in Wales. Curiously enough, Mr
Edwards never seriously attempted musical com
position. It was enough for him to interpret the glor-
ious harmonies of the great masters and to get his
fellows to appreciate them, and if his example had
been more generally followed Wales would have
been saved its modern flooding of third-rate
conglomeration of notes which some people dignify
by the name of music. An opportunity occurred
about the year 1836 for Mr Edwards to use his
great gift of song in a wider sphere than Aber-
ystwyth. He had gone” down South in the
exercise of his craft as shoemaker when there
occurred a succession of great demonstrations which
for the first time were then made in Wales against
the abuse of intoxicating liquors. Song played an
important part in that demonstration as it generally
does in “all great popular movement from the
French Revolution to the Salvation Army. A
choir of singers went from place to place over the
hills and into the valleys of Gwent and Morganwg
and, as it were, prepared the way for the more
prosaic attacks of the orators. Mr Edwards was
one of the principal singers in that movement and
his name became as well known in South
Wales as that of Mr Moody subsequently be-
came known in England for the exercise of a sim-
ilar gift. To those who are now accustomed to
hear even at places like Aberystwyth and Dol-
gelley the great oratorios performed with an orches-
tral band of soma twenty or thirty members, can
have but a faint conception of the difficulties of
producing an oratorio in Mr Edwards’s younger
days. To begin with, the full score of an oratorio
could not have been purchased under 6/- or 7-.
Now the tonic-solfa system of reading music is a
matter of the simplest effort of the mind. Then,
there was probably not more than two or three in
a hundred people assembled for a musical purpose
who could read the old notation. In addition to
that, it was the custom of those days for the
males to sing soprano, and for the females to sing
tenor, men taking bass, and boys and young men alto.
Mr Edwards was the first in Mid-Wales and pro-
bably in the whole of South Wales to get the
females to sing soprano and alto and the men to
sing tenor and bass. It was then thought that it
spoiled a woman’s voice to sing alto, and as the
young women of Mr Edwards’s early days did not
want their voices spoiled he had great difficulty
in getting them to sing the contralto parts and as
everybody then as now are very conservative in
traditional matters, he had much contention before
he succeeded in establishing the new order of sing
ing. In order to effect this, Mr Edwards took an
active and prominent part in the formation of a
united choral society which was wont to practice
in the Ysgoldy. But, as far as can now be ascer-
tained, it was the Tabernacle Choral Society,
formed and led by Mr Edwards, which first at-
tempted oratorial work in the town. The first full
score piece was the requiem composed in com-
memoration of John Williams, the missionary, and
then came the Messiah, which was sang without
accompaniment of any kind. So great was the
fame of the Society that it attracted people from
various parts of Wales to Aberystwyth for their
summer holidays. Ieuan Gwyllt, who after-
ward obtained high place in Wales as a
musician, was a member of the Society
but was not considered its best member either for
musical ability or for keeping always in tune.
When it is considered that, owing to an almost
total absence of musical knowledge in the members,
Mr Edwards had to teach each section of the choir
separately, his difficulties can be partly realized;
but this drawback had its advantage for it enabled
the leader to impose on the choir his own interpret-
ation of the music and, on the whole, to obtain
greater uniformity of tone. feeling, and movement
than is possible at the present time when each
member of a choir is a law unto himself. Mr
Edwards himself had a voice of remarkable com-
pass for while he could sing with ease heavy bass
songs, his favourites were the tenor solo,
“Thou shalt break them,” How vain
is man,” and Then shall the righteous
shine” solos which he expressed with all the
flexibility, vigour, and freshness of his inborn talent
and enthusiasm. The Tabernacle Society arose to
its zenitih when the family of the Hughes’s came to
town from North Wales and joined it. Not only
did the Society cultivate a taste in the town for
high-class music, but the whole congregation
instinctively learnt to appreciate and to be moved
by the concord of sweet sounds,” and, musically
as well as spiritually, to sing with the spirit and
with the understanding also. Mr Edwards could
remember the old hymns sung by the Methodist
fathers, and when the first phonograph was brought
to Aberystwyth, he sung into the recorder a couple
of Welsh hymns as the early Methodists used to
sing them. The cylinders were sent over to
America to his son, but were broken in transit. A
second impression was, however, subsequently
taken, and these are still in existence. Mr Edwards
had a gift of song which might have been made to
acquire for him considerable wealth. Few people
possessing so rare a gift have made less use of it for
selfish purposes. He devoted it to the service of
religion and of temperance. He led the Ardudwy
Temperance Choral Union which had its annual
festivals at Harlech Castle. For over half a
century he was precentor of one or other of the
Calvinistic Methodist Chapels in the town, in re-
cognition of which in 1889 he was presented with
an address and a fine American organ. At one
time, he acted as precentor of Shiloh Welsh Chapel
and of the English Chapel which held its services
after the Welsh services were over on Sunday
mornings. He was precentor of Salem almost up
to his death.

Mr Edwards was a Liberal in politics, though
he actively supported the late Mr David Davies
when he came out as a Unionist. All his life
he was a staunch teetotaler and an ad-
vocate of temperance and yet was opposed to his
party on the licensing questions. He held that the
reduction of the number of public houses would
not do away with the evil of drunkenness but, on
the contrary, strengthen the position of the re-
maining houses. He was a life-long and faithful
member of the Calvinistic Methodists, and a con-
stant and painstaking Sunday school teacher.

Mr Edwards married Elizabeth Jones of Bow
Street, who belonged to an unobstrusive and re-
spectable family in the neighborhood, who died in
1855. There was of the marriage five children.
The eldest daughter who was married to Mr James
Hughes, Llanbadarn, predeceased him. The sur-
vivors are Miss Annie Edwards, Mr Edward
Edwards, who is now in America, Elizabeth, wife
of the Rev J. A. Jenkins, registrar of Cardiff Uni-
versity College, and Mr Jack Edwards, who is
conductor of the Town Band. All the children
have possessed the gift of song in greater or less
degree. The deceased lived to see spring up
around him several great grand children and one great-
grand child.
The body was interred on Tuesday afternoon
at the Aberystwyth Cemetery. The chief mourners
were Miss Edwards, Mr Jack Edwards, Mr and
Mrs J. A. Jenkins, Mr David Lloyd, Portland-
street, and the grandsons Messrs Edward, Henry,
and John Hughes, and Richard Edgar Jenkins.
There was a very large attendance of ministers and
deacons and of the principal inhabitants of the
town. The Rev William Jones, North-parade,
officiated at the house in Great Darkgate-street;
the Rev Mortimer Green, U.C. W read a portion
of scripture at the grave, the Rev T. Levi prayed,
and the Rev W. Jones made a few remarks on the life
and character of the deceased. The singing
was very beautiful and pathetic. The hymns
selected were Ce’s ddwr o’r graig i’w yfed,” and
“Mae’n felus meddwl ambell dro,” and were sung
to “Ewing” and Farrant,” favourite tunes
of the deceased.
Wreaths were sent by Mrs D. Morgan, Pier-
street, Mrs Edwards and family, the Laurels, Mr
and Mrs John Thomas, draper, Mrs Edward
Hughes, the Misses Richards, West Bromwich, Mrs
S. S. O. Morris and family, Mrs Lloyd, Bryntirion
Villa, Mr J. G. W. Bonsall, Fronfraith, and one
from the members of the United Band, who also
attended in a body, and remained at the Cemetery
to perform the last offices.
Mr Jack Edwards, Miss Edwards, and Mrs
Austin Jenkins desire to thank their very many
friends for kind expressions of sympathy, which
have been greatly appreciated in their bereavement.

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

“Death of Mr Edward Edwards,” The Cardigan Bay Visitor (Aberystwyth Wales), 25 September 1897; digital images, (http://newspapers.library.wales : accessed 5 August 2017).

“Death of Mr Edward Edwards,” The Cambrian News and Merionethshire Standard (Wales), 24 September 1897; digital images, The National Library of Wales Welsh Newspapers Online (http://newspapers.library.wales : accessed 5 August 2017).

“ER COF [In Memory of] MR. EDWARD EDWARDS (PENCERDD CEREDIGION), ABERYSTWITH,” Y Goleuad (Wales), 29 September 1897; digital images, (http://newspapers.library.wales : accessed 4 August 2017).

“Mr. Edward Edwards (Pencerdd Ceredigion,” The Scranton Republican (Scranton, Pennslyvania), ; digital images, Newspapers. com (www.newspapers.com : accessed ).

Copyright 2017 Joanne Shackford Parkes  (sharing a link to this post is appreciated but please do not copy this material and paste it elsewhere)

Friday’s Faces From the Past – Edward Edwards (Pencerdd Ceredigion) (1816-1897) (Blog 7, Ancestor 40)

It seemed impossible to learn more about my 3rd great grandfather, Edward Edwards – the only information about Edward came from the 1923 death record of his son Edward R Edward stating his name, Edward R Edwards, that he was born in Wales, and that his wife’s name was not known.

We took a quick look for Edward Edwards in Wales with no birth date and no wife and decided we were at a dead end because there were so many Edward Edwards.  Then we found the January 1896 edition of The Cambrian which stated that Mr Edward R Edwards was the son of Mr Edward Edwards (Pencerdd Ceredigion), Aberystwyth, S. W.

A search for the words “Pencerdd Ceredigion” led us to the Dictionary of Welsh Biography which gave us his birth and death dates, told us he was a musician, listed many of his musical performances, and mentioned his son Jack Edwards.

We discovered that Edward’s bardic title Pencerdd Ceredigion referred to the chief singer of Cardiganshire and was issued to him at the ordination of the Eisteddfod (a Welsh festival of literature, music, and performance) in Aberystywth about October 7, 1865 by John Thomas, Pencerdd Gwalia.

And further research revealed these two wonderful photographs of Edward taken about 1875 and digitized by the National Library of Wales.  Fortunately they allow use of these photographs for non-commercial purposes allowing us to see what an amazing beard he had!!!

 

Photo Edward Edwards Pencerdd Ceredigion National Library of Wales 2
Edward Edwards – photo taken about 1875 by John Thomas and digitized by the National Library of Wales
Photo Edward Edwards Pencerdd Ceredigion National Library of Wales
Edward Edwards – photo taken about 1875 by John Thomas and digitized by the National Library of Wales 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’ve found a multitude of newspaper articles in both English and Welsh about Edward and are still trying to review, transcribe, and in some cases, translate them using Google Translate.  Most of the articles deal with various performances and festivals but a few have helped us identify family members.

We’re still working on transcribing Edward’s very long obituary which we’ll share in a future blog.

Children:

Mary Edwards (abt 1841 – 1887) – married James Hughes

Anne Edwards (abt 1842-1909) –

Edward R Edwards (1845-1923) – moved to Ohio, worked as a bookkeeper and account, married Margaret P Davis

Elizabeth Edwards (abt 1852-1899) – well known musician, garnered a scholarship in the music department of University College of Aberystwyth; married Rev John Austin Jenkins

Jack Edwards (abt 1853-1942) – talented musician, lived in Ohio in 1880s, worked at post office before leaving for Ohio, then as stationer and bookseller

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

“ABERYSTWYTH,” Baner ac Amserau Cymru (Denbigh, Wales), 7 October 1865; digital images, British Library Newspapers (galegroup.com : accessed 1 August 2017).

“Death of Mr Edward Edwards,” The Cardigan Bay Visitor (Aberystwyth Wales), 25 September 1897; digital images, (http://newspapers.library.wales : accessed 5 August 2017).

Dictionary of Welsh Biography (http://yba.llgc.org.uk : accessed 30 July 2017), Edward Edwards (Pencerdd Ceredigion; 1816-1897).

Evans George Eyre, Aberystwyth and its court leet (Aberystwyth: Welsh Gazette, 1902), page 72; digital images, Google Books (https://books.google.com/books : accessed 30 July 2017.

Evans Rev E. C., The Cambrian: A National Monthly Magazine, Published in the Interest of The Welsh-American People and their Children devoted to History, Biography, Literature Religion, Science, and General Celtic Intelligence (Utica, N.Y.: T. J. Griffiths, January 1896), page 29; digital image, Google Books (www.books.google.com : accessed 5 August 2017.

Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953, , Edward R Edwards, 16 October 1923; digital images, FamilySearch (http://www.familysearch.org : accessed 29 July 2013).

Copyright 2017 Joanne Shackford Parkes  (sharing a link to this post is appreciated but please do not copy this material and paste it elsewhere)